iPhone 8 screen repair
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iPhone 8 Screen Replacement – A Technician’s Guide from iMend

iPhone 8 Screen Repair
 

At the end of last year, we added the iPhone 8 / 8 to our website. The number of repairs for both devices have rapidly increased since the turn of the New Year with (as you can expect) screen replacements topping our most popular repairs list.

With this in mind, it would only be right to show our customers the detailed process our highly skilled technicians undertake when completing an iPhone 8 Plus screen (similar to iPhone 8 Screen repair) replacement:

iPhone 8 Plus Screen Replacement – A Technician’s Guide
Step 1 – Opening The Screen

Start by removing the screws from either side of the charging port. This will effectively loosen the the display assembly and allow the technician to wedge the iSesamo tool in between the framework and the display screen.

With the iPhone 8 being IP67 water resistant, trying to pry open the device can be rather tricky due to the amount of adhesive and gaskets contained in the device. It’s considerably harder to open then that of previous models.

Use the iSesamo tool to slide between the two compartments, splitting the adhesive and releasing the screen from the frame. The device should now open.

Step 2 – Disconnecting The Battery

On first glance, it’s obvious that Apple have decided to swap their tricky tri-point screws for dinky phillip-head (JIS)screws. Besides the change in screws, disconnecting the battery in this device is exactly the same procedure as the iPhone 7 .

Firstly, remove the lower display bracket securing the FPC connectors. There are four screws to remove in total, in order to prevent long screw damage (check our iPhone 7 screen replacement guide) in future steps, it’s advised to leave all screws in a memorable order. There are three different sized screws within this step, ensure that the screws go in the hole they came from.

Do not proceed with the repair until the battery is disconnected. Attempting a screen replacement while still connected to the battery can be costly, risking the chance of damaging the fresh new screen. Although there is a very slim chance of this happening, its better to be safe than sorry.

Now that the battery has been disconnected, use the spludger to disconnect the battery connector. Be careful when performing this operation, if you were to remove the connectors forcefully there is a strong risk of ruining the connection between the battery and the logic board.

Step 3 – Disconnecting The Display Assembly 

Now there is no power charging around the device, it’s safe to disconnect the display assembly from the motherboard. All iMend technicians use a plastic spludger when disconnecting the display assembly. Do not use too much force when prying the connectors, as it is easy to damage the connection between the motherboard and screen.

Disconnect the display connector situated at the lower end of the device. Once this is done, the display cable below becomes visible. The same procedure is used to disconnect the second cable.

Once the lower display cables have been disconnected, the tri-point screwdriver makes a cameo appearance to remove the two screws (1.0 mm and 1.2 mm) securing the upper bracket. Now use the plastic spludger to disconnect the top ribbon from the motherboard.

Step 4 – Removing Home Button/Touch I.D.

 

There are three screws securing the bracket and one directly in the centre of the home button. Once the screws are removed, the bracket will become loose again. The connector situated to the left of the home button must then be disconnected. Gently push under the display screen, then lift to remove the home button.

Step 5 – Removing Earpiece Speaker

The earpiece speaker is situated at the top of the device. Once the 1.7mm and two 2.6mm screws are removed, use tweezers to detach the bracket. Use the tweezers again to move the camera out of the way of the earpiece speaker.

Two small phillip screws either side of the speakers will become visible. Use a dedicated screwdriver to remove these screws, detaching the earphone speaker.  Remove the speaker with your tweezers.

Step 6 – Removing Front Camera and Sensory Cable

Once the earpiece speaker has been removed, lift the sensory cable out of the recess with the plastic spludger. This fragile cable is attached by extremely strong adhesive which ultimately could damage the component if removed with too much force. If needs be, heat the display assembly to make this step easier.

The pick tool is then pushed under the cable and then moved towards the screw posts. The housing is then lifted, popping the cable out of the plastic posts. The camera and sensory cable is now removed from the back of the display assembly.

Step 7 – Removing LCD Shield

 

There are six screws that attach the LCD shield to the display assembly. Once the six screws are removed, put display assembly onto a heat tray.

Step 8 – Applying LCD Shield To The New Screen

After the LCD shield has been cleaned, reapply the screws previously used on the broken display screen.

Step 9 – Re-Installing The Home Button

Re- installing the home button is by far the most challenging part of the repair. The connector situated to the left of the home button must be re connected using the plastic spludger. This must be done with precision, if re-attached incorrectly, the home button/touch I.D will no longer work, leaving the mobile unusable.

Step 10 – Transplanting The Earpiece Speaker, Front Camera, Sensory Cable And Flex Assemblies

IMG_20180109_103336

Transfer the flex over to the new display assembly helping the camera sit snug.

The earpiece speaker will now fit perfectly into the assembly. Once fitted, the front camera will bend back into place.  Place the bracket back into position in order to keep the camera safe and secure.

Step 11 – Reattaching The Sensory Panel

The sensory connector must be reattached to the motherboard with precision. If the connector is pressed with force there is a high chance of the bending the component. Often leading to dead pixels on the screen or an unresponsive display.

Step 12 – Reconnecting The Battery

Once the battery is connected, reattach the bracket to help secure the battery connectors. To attach the bracket correctly, ensure that the screws are placed in the correct holes. If screwed incorrectly,  long screw damage can occur, destroying the phone beyond economical repair.

Step 13 – Fixing The New Screen

Once the battery has been connected, the screen pops back into it’s location clips, a much easier process then that of the iPhone 7 . The final two screws either side of the charging port can now be added.

As the guide indicates, repairing such a highly valued device should always be undertaken by an expert. With a number of challenging procedures (particularly the home button and the transplanting of the camera) it would be a huge risk to perform this repair without the expert knowledge and experience of repairing iPhone devices.

Interested in getting your iPhone fixed by iMend? Click here to view their range of repairs. Of course if you book iPhone repairs with them in the North and East Yorkshire region it will be us, Mend My iPhone, that come to you as we are an iMend Approved Technician.

 

A direct link to their amazing article written by iMEND about iPhone 8 Screen repair

https://www.imend.com/blog/iphone-8-plus-screen-replacement-a-technicians-guide/

iPhone Battery Replacement Mend My iPhone, York
By James38 / Blog / / 2 Comments

Apple Battery Replacement

This is a copy and paste of Apple’s press release regarding it’s iPhone Battery

 

December 28, 2017
A Message to Our Customers about iPhone Battery and Performance
We’ve been hearing feedback from our customers about the way we handle performance for iPhones with older batteries and how we have communicated that process. We know that some of you feel Apple has let you down. We apologize. There’s been a lot of misunderstanding about this issue, so we would like to clarify and let you know about some changes we’re making.
First and foremost, we have never — and would never — do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience to drive customer upgrades. Our goal has always been to create products that our customers love, and making iPhones last as long as possible is an important part of that.
How batteries age
All rechargeable batteries are consumable components that become less effective as they chemically age and their ability to hold a charge diminishes. Time and the number of times a battery has been charged are not the only factors in this chemical aging process.
Device use also affects the performance of a battery over its lifespan. For example, leaving or charging a battery in a hot environment can cause a battery to age faster. These are characteristics of battery chemistry, common to lithium-ion batteries across the industry.
A chemically aged battery also becomes less capable of delivering peak energy loads, especially in a low state of charge, which may result in a device unexpectedly shutting itself down in some situations.
To help customers learn more about iPhone’s rechargeable battery and the factors affecting its performance, we’ve posted a new support article, iPhone Battery and Performance.
It should go without saying that we think sudden, unexpected shutdowns are unacceptable. We don’t want any of our users to lose a call, miss taking a picture or have any other part of their iPhone experience interrupted if we can avoid it.
Preventing unexpected shutdowns
About a year ago in iOS 10.2.1, we delivered a software update that improves power management during peak workloads to avoid unexpected shutdowns on iPhone 6, iPhone 6 Plus, iPhone 6s, iPhone 6s Plus, and iPhone SE. With the update, iOS dynamically manages the maximum performance of some system components when needed to prevent a shutdown. While these changes may go unnoticed, in some cases users may experience longer launch times for apps and other reductions in performance.
Customer response to iOS 10.2.1 was positive, as it successfully reduced the occurrence of unexpected shutdowns. We recently extended the same support for iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus in iOS 11.2.
Of course, when a chemically aged battery is replaced with a new one, iPhone performance returns to normal when operated in standard conditions.
Recent user feedback
Over the course of this fall, we began to receive feedback from some users who were seeing slower performance in certain situations. Based on our experience, we initially thought this was due to a combination of two factors: a normal, temporary performance impact when upgrading the operating system as iPhone installs new software and updates apps, and minor bugs in the initial release which have since been fixed.
We now believe that another contributor to these user experiences is the continued chemical aging of the batteries in older iPhone 6 and iPhone 6s devices, many of which are still running on their original batteries.
Addressing customer concerns
We’ve always wanted our customers to be able to use their iPhones as long as possible. We’re proud that Apple products are known for their durability, and for holding their value longer than our competitors’ devices.
To address our customers’ concerns, to recognize their loyalty and to regain the trust of anyone who may have doubted Apple’s intentions, we’ve decided to take the following steps:
Apple is reducing the price of an out-of-warranty iPhone battery replacement by $50 — from $79 to $29 — for anyone with an iPhone 6 or later whose battery needs to be replaced, starting in late January and available worldwide through December 2018. Details will be provided soon on apple.com.
Early in 2018, we will issue an iOS software update with new features that give users more visibility into the health of their iPhone’s battery, so they can see for themselves if its condition is affecting performance.
As always, our team is working on ways to make the user experience even better, including improving how we manage performance and avoid unexpected shutdowns as batteries age.
At Apple, our customers’ trust means everything to us. We will never stop working to earn and maintain it. We are able to do the work we love only because of your faith and support — and we will never forget that or take it for granted.

How we can help

We replace iPhone batteries at your home or workplace with our go-to repair service. The full repair takes approx 15 minutes prices and you can see our price page here

patently apple screen protection for iphone
By James38 / Blog / / 0 Comments

Patently Apple website is worth a visit for apple fanatics

www.patentlyapple.com is a must for any Apple Fan wanting to see what they have patented. I know !!

 

I’ve only just discovered it and it goes way back but way upto date too. There are some fantastic articles on there. From folding phone technology to making the Apple Pencil work with the Apple iPhone.

or have you heard of the Apple Watch Scribble Surface described on patently apple or my least favourite that’ll put Mend My iPhone out of business, the Apple Files Patent for Active Surface iDevice Protection

 

This is an extract from the blog at patently apple…

screen protection for iphone

 

Apple has been working on ways to protect iDevices from a fall going back to 2011 when the iPad was first introduced said patently apple. They won their first patent for this invention back in 2016. Another detailed patent for free fall protection was filed back in 2013. Today the US Patent & Trademark Office published another patent application from Apple relating to free fall protection covering “active surface protection.”

 

Apple’s invention specifically covers a portable electronic device that includes one or more bumpers that are operable to transition between a stowed position and a deployed position.

 

In the deployed position, the bumpers may be proud of one or more surfaces of the portable electronic device that the bumpers are not proud of in the stowed position. The bumpers may protect the surfaces from impact when proud of those surfaces if the portable electronic device contacts a surface, such as when the portable electronic device is dropped.

 

The bumpers may form portions of side corners or other portions of the portable electronic device in the stowed position. In transitioning from the stowed position to the deployed position, the bumpers may rotate and/or translate.

 

Apple’s patent FIG. 1B noted below depicts an environment after the user drops the first example portable electronic device and the bumpers transition to a deployed position to protect the surfaces of the portable electronic device from impacting the structure. The other patent figures show various styles of protective bumpers and a flowchart.

 

 

Christmas uk main in dates

UK Mail in Repairs

In case you were sending us any uk mail in repairs at this time of year please have a look at the attached Royal Mail posting dates to make sure you can get out to us in time.

Sadly we cannot guarantee the return dates this close to Christmas but more than happy to accept the repairs to get them underway and back to you as soon as possible.

We are working across Christmas and will publish our dates tomorrow so that you know how and when you can get us.

Christmas uk main in dates

 

 

iPhone Call out repair partners in Hull

Hull iPhone Repairs work with us as a repair partner

 

We like working with other businesses in other areas of the country as we get calls from all over the place and it’s always good to know a recommended repair partner to send them to if you need an iPhone call out repair.

iPhone Screen Repairs Hull operate in a very similar way to us and have the same, work strategies. If you happen to live in Hull we can highly recommend them for their same day call out ability to get to you wherever you are.

 

 

Sudbury iPhone Repairs have become our latest partner

 

We like working with other businesses in other areas of the country as we get calls from all over the place and it’s always good to know a recommended repair partner to send them to if you need an iPhone call out repair.

Sudbury iPhone Repairs operate in a very similar way to us and have the same, if not better warranties, and work strategies. If you happen to live in any of the areas above we can highly recommend them for their same day call out, mail in repairs and ability to get to you wherever you are.

 

 

apple iMac pro
By James38 / BlogNo sidebar / / 0 Comments

the new apple iMac Pro

iMac Pro

 

The new Apple iMac Pro is am amazing looking thing.

You just have to look at the page to it’s a colossal machine. Starting at almost £5K and configurable upto a 10 core processor and goodness knows what else I got it upto over £12k as a price tag and I haven’t a clue what it’ll do that my MacBook Pro won’t do that doesn’t do anything my 2010 MacBook unibody doesn’t do – except look beautiful.

iMac Pro

Look at Apple’s website for the spec here

By James38 / Blog / / 0 Comments

Apple Pay Cash coming soon in latest iOS

 

Apple’s new iOS 11.2 software update went live Saturday, adding Apple Pay Cash and faster wireless charging to supported iPhones.

For anyone with an iPhone 6 or later, the update’s Apple Pay Cash feature opens up the ability to send cash to friends and family over iMessage. While I didn’t see the feature immediately turned on after updating my own iPhone to iOS 11.2, when it does appear it should work similarly to Paypal’s Venmo service.

Anyone with the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus or iPhone X can look forward to faster wireless charging, with the update release specifically noting improvements when using third-party chargers. That’s pretty much every Qi wireless charger currently out, as Apple’s own AirPower charging mat is planned for a 2018 release.

Other improvements and fixes listed by Apple include:

  • Improves video camera stabilization
  • Adds support in Podcasts to automatically advance to the next episode from the same show
  • Adds support in HealthKit for downhill snow sports distance as a data type
  • Fixes an issue that could cause Mail to appear to be checking for new messages even when a download is complete
  • Fixes an issue that could cause cleared Mail notifications from Exchange accounts to reappear
  • Improves stability in Calendar
  • Resolves an issue where Settings could open to a blank screen
  • Fixes an issue that could prevent swiping to Today View or Camera from the Lock Screen
  • Addresses an issue that could prevent Music controls from displaying on the Lock Screen
  • Fixes an issue that could cause app icons to be arranged incorrectly on the Home Screen
  • Addresses an issue that could prevent users from deleting recent photos when iCloud storage is exceeded
  • Addresses an issue where Find My iPhone sometimes wouldn’t display a map
  • Fixes an issue in Messages where the keyboard could overlap the most recent message
  • Fixes an issue in Calculator where typing numbers rapidly could lead to incorrect results
  • Addressed an issue where the keyboard could respond slowly
  • Adds support for real-time text (RTT) phone calls for the deaf and hard of hearing
  • Improves VoiceOver stability in Messages, Settings, App Store and Music
  • Resolves an issue that prevented VoiceOver from announcing incoming Notifications
By James38 / Blog / 0 Comments

How to reset a forgotten Apple ID password

 

What should you do if you’ve forgotten the password for your Apple ID account? If you’re having trouble signing into iCloud, iTunes or the App Store, these tips will help

by

iPhone and Mac users have to enter Apple ID details so frequently – when buying an app or iTunes music, accessing iCloud email or other services, updating an OS – that you wouldn’t think we’d forget our passwords. But we do.

Maybe you got confused when Apple made us change to a new password; maybe you picked one that was just too complicated to remember. (Here’s how to choose a good strong password.) Whatever the reason, forgetting the password to your Apple ID account can be a serious pain – so we’re going to explain how to reset it.

One last thing before we get started: your password might not be working because it’s been locked by Apple for security reasons – perhaps because an attempt had been made to hack it. Should this happen to you, try this tutorial: How to unlock a disabled Apple ID.

How to reset your Apple ID password

Assuming you can’t just think really hard until you remember what the password is, your best bet is to reset it. Here’s how to do that.

  1. Go to the Apple ID web page at appleid.apple.com and click ‘Forgot Apple ID or password’.
  2. Enter the email address you use with your Apple ID and click continue (if you can’t remember which email address you use we address that here).
  3. You will also need to enter some text to prove you are not a robot. (Tip: if you can’t read the text, just keep clicking until you can.)
  4. The next step will depend on the type of security you have set up for your Apple account. If you have set up two-step verification or two-factor authentication this will involve receiving details via another device – we explain the difference between two-step verification and two-factor authentication here.
  5. If you haven’t set up either of these extra levels of security it will be a case of getting an email or answering some security questions.

We look at the different ways you can reset your password in more detail below.

Answer security questions

When setting up a new iPad, iPhone or Mac, or when creating an Apple ID, you were probably asked to enter answers to some security questions: the name of the road where you grew up, perhaps, or the name of a favourite teacher.

If you choose to answer your security questions these are the steps you will need to go through:

  1. Start by entering your date of birth.
  2. Apple will then ask you two questions. Enter the correct answers and you’ll arrive on a Reset Password page.
  3. Now enter your new password twice (so that Apple can confirm you’ve spelled it the same way each time). Your password needs to have 8 or more characters, upper and lowercase letters, and at least one number. It also cannot contain the same character three times in a row (or any spaces), and you’re not allowed to reuse a password you’ve used in the past year.

 

What if you forget the answers to your security questions?

Remember that it’s not just the answers, but also the way you wrote them: watch out for misspellings or shortenings (Avenue becoming Ave, for instance). It’s has to be exactly the same as the way you answered during setup.

It’s possible to change the questions and/or answers by going to appleid.apple.com, but you’ll need to log on with your Apple ID and password. So that may not be useful for those of you reading this article.

Still, even if you’ve forgotten the answers to your security questions you should still be able to request that the link to change the password for your Apple ID is sent to the alternative email you registered to the account.

Send a password reset email

Rather than answering the security questions you can choose instead to have a password reset email sent to you. The password reset email will be sent to a second email address you have associated with your Apple ID – perhaps a work email.

Before you select this option make sure you have access to the email. Luckily you’ll get a hint as to which email address Apple is using, because you’ll be shown part of the address.

  1. From the Reset Password screen at https://iforgot.apple.com/password/verify/appleid choose Get an email and press Continue
  2. The email will arrive at the second email address associated with your account with the title “How to reset your Apple ID password”.
  3. Click the ‘Reset now’ link in the email.
  4. The email will come from [email protected] and include a warning in case it wasn’t you who requested the change of password.

 

Two-factor authentication

Two-factor authentication is an extra level of security that Apple has been pushing since the roll out of iOS 10 and macOS Sierra. (Here’s how to set up two-factor authentication, although here are some reasons why you might not want to use it.)

Essentially, if you’ve set up two-factor authentication as well as entering your password you will be required to enter a code Apple sends to your iPhone or Mac.

If you’ve set up two-factor authentication and you want to change your password, you’ll still need to go to appleid.apple.com and click on ‘Forgot Apple ID or password’.

  1. At the Apple ID page you’ll be asked to enter the email address (and characters to prove you aren’t a robot). Then you will be asked for the mobile number associated with your two-factor authentication.
  2. Once you’ve entered the correct number you’ll see a screen offering to let you reset your password from another device or from a trusted phone number. Obviously you need to make sure you have access to these.
  3. If you choose to reset it from another device you’ll receive an alert – in our case the alert arrived on the MacBook Pro we were using, and we were given a link to System Preferences > iCloud and the option to Reset Password.
  4. If you choose to reset it from a trusted phone number you will see a warning that Account recovery is require to reset your password from the internet. If you have access to a device running iOS 10 or macOS Sierra or later you will be able to use that to reset the password. If that’s the case you should cancel and choose the ‘reset it from another device’ option as per step 3. Otherwise, choose Start Account Recovery.
  5. WARNING: It can take a few days or even longer to regain access to your account so we don’t recommend you use this step unless it is a last resort! If you do go through this step Apple will send a text message to you once your account is ready for recovery. You will then need to enter a verification code sent by Apple in order to regain access to your account.

 

Two-step verification

Two-step verification is an older security system that Apple introduced a few years ago after there was a lot of negative publicity about iCloud security (celebrities were having their iCloud accounts hacked, which meant that personal photos were leaking online).

Apple users who were concerned about security at the time may have two-step verification set up for their Apple ID. If this applies to you, you would have been sent a 14-character Recovery Key that Apple advised you to print and keep in a safe place.

If you’re using two-step verification (and this may be the best you can do, because older devices don’t support two-factor authentication), every time you want to sign into iCloud you need to enter your Apple ID and password as well as a verification code that will be sent to one of your devices.

If you don’t have both a verification code and password you will be locked out of your account, and should this happen you have to use your 14-character Recovery Key to gain access again.

With two-step verification, password recovery depends on whether you know the Recovery Key. If you don’t, you won’t be able to recover your account. Even Apple is unable to reset your password if you don’t have this Recovery Key… so don’t lose it!

If you have this form of security and don’t know where your Recovery Key is then you can get a new one by going to your Apple ID account, signing in with your password and email address and choosing Replace Lost Key.

What if you forget your email address?

Along with your password you will need to enter your Apple ID, which is usually an email address you associate with the account.

Perhaps it’s less likely to happen, but if you don’t often sign in for Apple services and to buy things from Apple, you might forget which email address is tied to your Apple ID. Luckily, there’s a quick way to find out which email address you need. You just need to find a device that is already signed on to your Apple ID.

On an iPad or iPhone:

  1. Go to Settings > iTunes & App Store. You should see your Apple ID at the top if you’re logged in.
  2. Alternatively go to Settings and tap your name at the top of the page. If you’re logged in here you will see the email associated with your Apple ID under your name.
  3. You may also see the email address in Settings > Messages > Send & Receive; Settings > FaceTime, or Settings > Mail.

On a Mac or PC:

  1. Go to System Preferences > iCloud. Again you should see your Apple ID if you’re logged in.
  2. If you aren’t logged in here you may find the email in Mail > Preferences > Accounts.
  3. Alternatively, if you’ve used them on the Mac, you may find the details in FaceTime (select FaceTime > Preferences > Settings) or Messages (Messages > Preferences, then click Accounts).
  4. Another way to find your Apple ID is to open iTunes and check for previous purchases. In iTunes find a purchase, right-click and choose Get Info then File. You may see the email address beside your name.

Online

If you fail to find your Apple ID after trying those methods, you will need to visit the Apple ID page online at appleid.apple.com. Below the boxes for Apple ID and Password, click ‘Forgot Apple ID or password’.

Enter your first name, last name and email address. If you enter the wrong email address, you can try again with a different one until the email address is recognised. It doesn’t seem to be completely foolproof, however: we entered the email address we know is associated with our Apple ID and we were greeted with the No Apple ID Found message. Hopefully you’ll have more luck than we did.

Once you’ve changed your Apple ID password you will need to update it in the iCloud settings in any Apple devices you have.

By James38 / Blog / / 0 Comments

PSA: Severe Vulnerability in All Wi-Fi Devices

This entry was posted in General Security on October 16, 2017 by Mark Maunder   0 Replies

This is a public service announcement (PSA) from the Wordfence team regarding a security issue that has a wide impact.

Today is being called “Black Monday” in many information security circles. We have had a major Wi-Fi vulnerability announced that affects absolutely every device that supports Wi-Fi. The vulnerability allows attackers to decrypt WPA2 connections. A second vulnerability also emerged today, and we will cover that at the end of this post.

The Wi-Fi vulnerability is being called “KRACK”, which is short for Key Reinstallation Attacks.

I’m going to cover the problem in relatively non-technical terms in this post so that you are able to clearly understand how this affects you and what you can do about it, right now.

Once you are done reading this, I strongly recommend you spread the word, because this Wi-Fi weakness can allow attackers to crack WPA2 which was previously thought of as a secure Wi-Fi encryption protocol.

The WPA2 Wi-Fi Vulnerability

WPA2 is a protocol that secures all modern protected Wi-Fi networks. According to statistics by Wigle.net, it secures 60% of the world’s Wi-Fi networks.

Researchers at KU Leuven, a university in Flanders in Belgium, have discovered a way for an attacker to read sensitive information that is sent over a Wi-Fi network using WPA2.

Attackers can use this to steal sensitive information like credit card numbers, passwords, chat messages, emails, photos and more. The attack works against all modern protected Wi-Fi networks.

It may also be possible for an attacker to inject malicious information into the Wi-Fi network. This could include ransomware and malware.

The vulnerability is in the Wi-Fi standard itself, and not in individual products or their implementations. That means that all products that correctly implement the WPA2 standard are affected.

If your device supports Wi-Fi, it is likely affected by this vulnerability. 

Products that are known to be affected by this at this time include Android, Linux, Apple, Microsoft Windows, Linksys and more. The list of affected vendors is enormous, and vendors including Amazon, Cisco and Netgear are scrambling to release patches to fix this issue.

BleepingComputer has compiled a running list of vendors that will be growing over time as more information about patches becomes available.

What to Do About the WPA2 Vulnerability

This affects every device you own that uses Wi-Fi. If your device uses public Wi-Fi, you are at higher risk. The vendors that make your products are working on patches which they will release in the coming days. As they release the patches, you will need to update your devices and hardware.

The good news is that this vulnerability does not require you to replace any hardware. It is fixable through a software update.

The devices and hardware you will need to update, once patches are released, include the following:

  • Desktop workstations
  • Laptops/notebooks
  • Mobile phones
  • Tablets and e-readers that use Wi-Fi
  • Home and office routers
  • Home devices like NEST, Amazon Echo and Google Home
  • Printers, both home and office, that use Wi-Fi
  • Any other device that uses Wi-Fi

You should prioritize devices that use public Wi-Fi higher than your other devices. This puts mobile phones and tablets at the top of the list.

How to Stay on Top of Updates

Your desktop, mobile and tablet devices will prompt you when an important security update is available. Many may update automatically. Most devices also provide an option to manually check for updates. We recommend you do that periodically this week so that you catch any updates as soon as they are released.

For routers, printers and other “Internet of things” devices, you may have to sign into the device to manually update the device “firmware.” For routers, you can contact your Internet service provider for help if you are unsure how to update. You may need to consult the manual of other devices or do a Google search to learn if they are affected.

You can find out the technical details on the KRACK attack from the researchers themselves at krackattacks.com.

Black Monday

Another vulnerability known as “ROCA” was also announced today. This vulnerability involves an attack on public key encryption which may weaken the way we authenticate software when installing it. It affects many other systems that rely on public/private key encryption and signing. Fixing this also requires you to update your devices using vendor-released software updates, so keep an eye out for security updates for your devices and workstations that fix any ROCA-related issues.

The combination of KRACK and ROCA is why we are referring to today as “Black Monday.” These are both severe vulnerabilities, and they emerged on the same day.

It is imperative that we get the word out about these vulnerabilities so that our friends and colleagues can update their devices before they are exploited. Please spread the word.